Rise Early, Move Fast

On Saturday June 3, 2017 a group opposing the construction of the Diamond Pipeline made their way to an active work site where they hung a banner and planted traditional Muscogee/Creek tobacco plants in the pipelines path near Checotah, Oklahoma.  For nearly two hours people drove by taking photos of the group from their vehicles and then the police arrived escorting a pipeline worker.  The police said the group could stay and protest as long as they didn't block the construction entrance.  The worker checked the equipment and said it seemed like no damage had been done.  No arrests were made and no charges were pressed.  The Diamond Pipeline is slated to run from Cushing, OK through Arkansas and end in Memphis, TN.

 

 Excerpt from Press Release:

We will plant sacred traditional Mvskoke (Muscogee/Creek) tobacco plants in the path of the

Diamond pipeline to not only ensure future generations will have this sacred and traditional

medicine available to them, but also to show in a visible way the destruction and chaos this

pipeline (and all pipelines) inflict upon the very lifesources that sustain humanity. We will sing a

Chahta (Choctaw) Trail of Tears song to mourn the loss of life and medicine that will no longer

be with us or available to future generations because of this pipeline.

 

We are not inciting a riot, we do not condone the use of violence, we are peaceful, prayerful,

and unarmed, we are not assembled under any organization - we are individuals acting upon

our own accord. We seek to not only stand for the citizens of Oklahoma and against the

destruction, chaos, and loss of life caused by Big Oil, but to also demonstrate to the rest of the

world the dire, urgent, imperative situation being forced upon the people of Oklahoma. We will

no longer tolerate being a “throw-away” people in a “fly-over” state. We stand to let everyone

know the people of the state of Oklahoma are not dispensable.

4:11 A.M. Ben Carnes, a Choctaw elder prepares the four Muscogee/Creek tobacco plants that will be placed in the direct path of the pipeline.

4:11 A.M.

Ben Carnes, a Choctaw elder prepares the four Muscogee/Creek tobacco plants that will be placed in the direct path of the pipeline.

(top) 6:27 A.M. The location had been scouted in the weeks before.  Somewhere near Checotah, Oklahoma.    (bottom) 6:33 A.M. Prayer ties are hung on the entrance gate.

(top) 6:27 A.M.

The location had been scouted in the weeks before.  Somewhere near Checotah, Oklahoma.   

(bottom) 6:33 A.M.

Prayer ties are hung on the entrance gate.

6:33 A.M. Arriving at the construction site.    

6:33 A.M.

Arriving at the construction site.  

 

6:34 A.M.   (Left) Nokusece Jacob Wind, Muscogee/Creek and (Right)  Jake, Diné.  Banner drop.  

6:34 A.M.  

(Left) Nokusece Jacob Wind, Muscogee/Creek and (Right)  Jake, Diné.  Banner drop.  

6:35 A.M. (Left) Ben Carnes, Choctaw Elder.  (Center) Josephine, Choctaw. (Right) Ashley McCray, Oglala Lakota and Absentee-Shawnee.  Planting tobacco in the pipelines path.

6:35 A.M.

(Left) Ben Carnes, Choctaw Elder.  (Center) Josephine, Choctaw. (Right) Ashley McCray, Oglala Lakota and Absentee-Shawnee.  Planting tobacco in the pipelines path.

7:00 A.M. Waiting.  Jonathan of the Choctaw Tribe.  

7:00 A.M.

Waiting.  Jonathan of the Choctaw Tribe.  

7:04 A.M. Sydne Gray, Muscogee/Creek.  

7:04 A.M.

Sydne Gray, Muscogee/Creek.  

 
Gallery

(click photos to scroll through)

 

7:38 A.M. Jonathan burns sage at the construction entrance. 

7:38 A.M.

Jonathan burns sage at the construction entrance. 

7:42 A.M. Josephine burning Sage as pipeline workers watch and take pictures from their truck.

7:42 A.M.

Josephine burning Sage as pipeline workers watch and take pictures from their truck.

8:17 A.M. The Police arrive.

8:17 A.M.

The Police arrive.

8:27 A.M. A pipeline worker arrives to check the scene for damages.

8:27 A.M.

A pipeline worker arrives to check the scene for damages.

8:32 A.M.   The press photographs the Police who photograph the protesters who photograph the police.  

8:32 A.M.  

The press photographs the Police who photograph the protesters who photograph the police.  

8:29 A.M. After prayer and the OK from Ben, the Choctaw Elder, the group decides to leave.  They have accomplished their goal for the day.  The locals have seen them.  The media has seen them.  They have their numbers and will fight another day.  

8:29 A.M.

After prayer and the OK from Ben, the Choctaw Elder, the group decides to leave.  They have accomplished their goal for the day.  The locals have seen them.  The media has seen them.  They have their numbers and will fight another day.

 

8:56 A.M.   Going Home.

8:56 A.M.  

Going Home.